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  • Leadership | Cancer Research Programs | Cancer Unit Partnerships

    Developing and Implementing a Cancer Prevention and Control Research Curriculum
    Funded By: National Cancer Institute
    Project Period:  2010 – 2015
    Principal Investigator: Lee S. Caplan, MD, PhD, MPH
    The purpose of this project is to develop and execute a cancer prevention and control curriculum training program at the Morehouse School of Medicine (MSM) that will help prepare professional students in public health and in the biomedical sciences for positions in cancer prevention and control research. The curriculum will be based on a framework for addressing cancer prevention and control from bench to bedside to the community and will emphasize research targeted at reduction and elimination of cancer disparities.

    REACH U.S. (Racial and Ethnic Approached to Community Health/SUCCEED Southeastern Center US Collaborative CEED)
    Funded By:  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    Project Period:  2007 – 2012
    Principal Investigator:  Daniel S. Blumenthal, MD, MPH
    MSM PRC is an established Center of Excellence in the Elimination of Disparities (CEED) known as the Southeastern US Collaborative CEED, or “SUCCEED.” SUCCEED seeks to eliminate disparities in breast and cervical cancer among African American women. The project provides training and technical assistance to agencies and organizations throughout the region in evidence-based strategies to increase breast and cervical cancer screening among African-Americans and also provides training and technical assistance in community coalition-building, using the Community Organization and Development for Health Promotion model.

    Healthcare Disparities: Partnerships with NCCCP and the Community Networks Program (CNP) Institutions to Increase Screening in Racial / Ethnic Minority and Other Underserved Populations.
    Funded By:  National Cancer Institute
    Project Period:  2010 – 2012
    Principal Investigator:  Sandra Hamilton, RN
    This project underwrites a partnership between Morehouse School of Medicine and the Nancy N. and J.C. Lewis Cancer Center and Research Pavillion of the St. Joseph's/Candler Health System in Savannah, which is a member of the National Cancer Institute's National Community Cancer Center Program. The purpose of the partnership is to increase cancer screening among minorities in the Savannah area.

    Colorectal Cancer Screening Intervention Project (CCSIP)
    Funded By:  Georgia Department of Community Health
    Project Period:  2010 – 2011
    Principal Investigator:  Selina Smith, PhD, MDiv
    MSM is providing training to facilitators in five of Georgia's Regional Cancer Coalitions to conduct EPICS, the Educational Program to Increase Colorectal Cancer Screening. EPICS was tested in a community intervention trial at the MSM PRC and shown to be efficacious.

    Acceptability of the HPV Vaccine among low income African American and Hispanic male adolescents, their parents, and healthcare providers.
    Funded By:  National Cancer Institute (Supplement to MI/CCP)
    Project Period:  2010 – 2011
    Principal Investigator:  Nicole Martin, MD, MPH
    This qualitative research project explores the attitudes of African-American and Hispanic male adolescents, their parents, and their healthcare providers toward the human papillomavirus vaccine.

    Developing a Community Health Educator (CHE) Education/Outreach Plan
    Funded By:  National Cancer Institute (Supplement to MI/CCP)
    Project Period:  2010 – 2011
    Principal Investigator:  Lisa Hinton, MPH
    In this project, our Community Health Educator will work with the Atlanta Cancer Awareness Partnership to develop a plan for cancer community outreach.

    Collaborative Community Engagement Research
    Funded By:  National Center for Research Resources (Drew subcontract)
    Project Period:  2010 – 2011
    Principal Investigator:  Sandra Hamilton, RN
    MSM is one of several sites conducting community outreach as part of the Research Centers in Minority Institutions Translational Research Network.

    Minority Institution/Cancer Center Partnership
    Funded By: National Cancer Institute
    Project Period: 2006-2011
    Principal Investigator:  Daniel S. Blumenthal, MD, MPH
    This infrastructure program includes 3 pilot research projects, a full research project, and cores in biostatistics, bioethics, community outreach, cancer education, research training and career development, planning and evaluation, and administration. Major project goals are to: build research and training capacity at MSM; create stable, long-term collaborations between MSM, Tuskegee University and the University of Alabama, Birmingham (UAB) Cancer Center in research, training, career development, and outreach; improve effectiveness of the UAB Cancer Center research, education, and outreach for underserved populations; export successful approaches for addressing disparities to all cancer centers and other key networks and consortiums.

    National Black Leadership Initiative on Cancer III: Community Networks Program (NBLIC III: CNP)
    Funded By:  National Cancer Institute, Center to Reduce Cancer Health Disparities
    Project Period – 2005 – 2011
    Principal Investigator:  Daniel S. Blumenthal, MD, MPH
    Website: National Cancer Institute
    Building on established community partnerships, the NBLIC III: Community Networks Program (NBLIC III: CNP) at the Morehouse School of Medicine is a large-scale national Community Networks Program aimed at reducing cancer health disparities among African Americans. The 20-year-old National Black Leadership Initiative on Cancer utilizes its core infrastructure, which includes a National Office; three Regional Research Offices (e.g., MSM/Southern; University of Illinois at Chicago/Midwestern; Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science/Western; and Eastern, with support from the National Office); and 33 volunteer community coalitions in 29 states to reach its overall goal of reducing cancer health disparities for African Americans by developing collaborations that enhance existing community partnerships. These partnerships address the disconnect between delivery systems and community-based participatory education, research and training in the African-American community.