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  • Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Core Research: Prevention Intervention Meeting Them at the Gate (PIMTAG)
    Funded By:  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    Project Period:  2009 – 2014
    Principal Investigator:  Ronald L. Braithwaite, PhDCo-Principal Investigator;Elleen M. Yancey, PhD
    Prevention Intervention Meeting Them at the Gate is the core research project of the MSM Prevention Research Center. This project is a behavior modification intervention for adult African American men with a history of substance abuse and risky sexual behavior. It is designed to reduce high risk HIV and STD related behaviors. A jail based intervention for rapid release for African American men.

    Efficacy to effectiveness transition of an Educational Program to Increase Colorectal Cancer Screening (EPICS)
    Funded By: National Cancer Institute
    Project Period: 2012-2017
    Principal Investigators:  Selina A. Smith PhD, MDiv; Daniel S. Blumenthal, MD, MPH
    This project tests four approaches to disseminating an evidence-based intervention on a national level.  The intervention, entitled EPICS (Educational Program to Increase Colorectal Cancer Screening), was developed at the PRC and tested both in a research setting and in practice.  In this project, we have engaged 20 community coalitions nationwide; they will recruit 7,200 African-American participants age 50-74 to test the four approaches to disseminating the EPICS. They will also measure the extent to which EPICS is accepted and the fidelity of implementation in various settings and estimate its potential translatability and public health impact. This four-arm cluster randomized trial compares the following implementation strategies: Passive Arms (1) web access to facilitator training materials and toolkits without technical assistance (TA) (2) web access, but with technical assistance (TA); Active Arms (3) in-person access to facilitator training materials and toolkits without TA and (4) in-person access with TA. Primary outcome measures are the reach (the proportion of community coalitions and individuals participating ) and effectiveness (post-intervention changes in CRC screening rates).  Secondary outcomes include adoption (percentage of community coalitions implementing the EPICS sessions) and implementation (quality and consistency of the intervention delivery).  The extent to which community coalitions continue to implement EPICS post-implementation (maintenance) will also be measured.  Cost-effectiveness analysis will also be conducted.

    Atlanta Clinical and Translational Science Institute (ACTSI) – Community Engagement Research Program (CERP)
    Funded By: National Institutes of Health, National Center for Advancing Translational Science (NCATS)
    Project Period: 2012-2017
    Program Director: Daniel S. Blumenthal, MD, MPH 
    ACTSI is funded by a Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) and is led by Emory University, along with partners Morehouse School of Medicine, Georgia Institute of Technology, and Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta. ACTSI is one of 64 medical research institutions working together as a national consortium to improve translational research – that is, advancing new discoveries in the laboratory into clinical trials and thence into practice in the community. ACTSI's Community Engagement Research Program promotes community intervention trials and mobilizes communities as research partners with academia. The ACTSI website is at www.actsi.org.

    Completed Prevention Research Initiatives

    Atlanta Violence Prevention Capacity Building Project (ACBP)
    Funded By: Administration for Children and Families
    Project Period: 2008 - 2010
    Principal Investigator: James P. Griffin, PhD
    The purpose of the project is to facilitate capacity among violence prevention partners to address violence prevention needs of selected community-based organizations (CBOs) and to improve CBOs' ability to provide science-based violence prevention interventions at the community level.  Major project goals are to evaluate the effectiveness of a leadership and change agent curriculum for high school youth aimed at disseminating science-based violence prevention strategies among decision makers.

    Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) – Community Engagement and Research Program (CERP)
    Funded By:  National Institutes of Health, National Clinical Research Resources
    Project Period:  2007 – 2012
    Principal Investigator:  Daniel S. Blumenthal, MD, MPH
    The Atlanta Clinical and Translational Science Institute (Atlanta-CTSI) is led by Emory University, along with partners Morehouse School of Medicine, Georgia Institute of Technology, and Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta. ACTSI is one of 46 medical research institutions working together as a national consortium to improve the way biomedical research is conducted across the country.  ACTSI's Community Engagement & Research Program promotes effective community intervention trials and recruits participants for transformative clinical studies.

    Emory Center for Injury Control
    Funded By:  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    Project Period:  2009 - 2010
    Principal Investigator: James P. Griffin, PhD
    This collaborative project (with Emory University) builds translational research and practice capability toward unintentional and intentional injury including violence prevention.  The major project goal is to evaluate the effectiveness of four pilot research projects.

    REACH U.S. (Racial and Ethnic Approached to Community Health/SUCCEED Southeastern Center US Collaborative CEED)
    Funded By:  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    Project Period:  2007 – 2012
    Principal Investigator:  Daniel S. Blumenthal, MD, MPH
    MSM PRC is an established Center of Excellence in the Elimination of Disparities (CEED) known as the Southeastern US Collaborative CEED, or “SUCCEED.” SUCCEED seeks to eliminate disparities in breast and cervical cancer among African American women. The project provides training and technical assistance to agencies and organizations throughout the region in evidence-based strategies to increase breast and cervical cancer screening among African-Americans and also provides training and technical assistance in community coalition-building, using the Community Organization and Development for Health Promotion model.